By using the Facebook tracking pixel or the Adwords pixel, you can help to define your audience and work to entice them to come back to your site. Let's say the didn't finish their purchase or they simply showed up and left after adding something to their shopping cart, or they filled out a lead form and disappeared, you can re-target those individuals.


Using Facebook only to market isn't a safe bet simply because you're at Facebook's mercy and you are limited by the type of content you can create and share. Having your own website gives you a more power -- you can blog, host your videos, create infographics, and build and email subscription list. You can also set up your website with social sharing buttons to hit all of the social networks, not just Facebook. In the long term, it's the better choice for affiliates.
The direct affiliate marketing approach aims to promote products and services in posts. For example, you create a Facebook post about a book that you read and include an affiliate link from Amazon.com. Whoever clicks on the link will go straight to Amazon. By contrast, the indirect approach aims to direct traffic offsite where affiliate links are present. For instance, you create a Facebook post about the best marketing tools and add a link to your blog.

You'll want to pick a profile picture that’s easy for your audience to recognize -- anything from a company logo for a big brand, to a headshot of yourself if you're a freelancer or consultant. Being recognizable is important to getting found and Liked, especially in Facebook Search. It’s what shows up in search results, pictured at the top of your Facebook Page, the thumbnail image that gets displayed next to your posts in people’s feeds … so choose wisely.
×