One way to use Facebook Pages is to focus on a theme or topic and promote related products and services. For instance, a travel and leisure page would feature content about travel, vacation, lifestyle, adventure, relaxation, and so on. The affiliate could post flash sales for discounted airfares, accommodations, and car rentals. If the affiliate has a travel blog, she can post content from her site. If you create a page about you, your posts can relate to your work, experiences, interests, and hobbies.
The solution: don’t sell. Or rather, do it, but in a way that doesn’t feel overly promotional or sales-focused. Try out writing different types of updates and see what sticks and what doesn’t. Examine the wording you use, the links you post, and what types of posts get the most interaction. This is a great way to try out Facebook affiliate marketing before you try the next more professional suggestion.
Sure, you’re not the brand itself, but you are employed by various brands, and I’m sure you want to see success in this industry. For that reason, it’s important you take control and learn about your audience while trying to form connections. Take cues from your competitors or other affiliates. What kind of advertisements are they utilizing, and do they seem to be working?
We’ve all heard those horror stories about folks who accidentally published personal content to their employers’ social media channels -- a marketer’s worst nightmare. So to avoid publishing mishaps like those, assign Facebook Business Page roles only to the employees who absolutely need it for the work they do each day. And before you do that, be sure to provide adequate training to those who are new to social media management, so they aren't confused about when they should be hitting "publish," what they should be posting, if something should be scheduled first, and who they should be posting it as.
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