Every year, hundreds of millions of documents are notarized in the United States: wills, mortgages, citizenship forms, handgun applications. While for decades, this has all been done in person, there is a budding crop of sites that allow notaries to take their services online. If you’re already a notary, you can sell your services online. Or, if you want to get started, check out the National Notary’s checklist for becoming a certified notary.
Your page could operate very similarly to a group, although there is slightly less interaction with a page. Groups, by their very nature, encourage interaction. Pages are more to keep your audience updated and to keep them abreast of your latest content. Groups can sometimes feel a little overwhelming to manage, and pages are more straightforward. If you can continue to post useful content for your audience, then you’ll be able to get them equally engaged—ask questions, share videos, and, of course, link to your affiliate link posts or directly to certain products and services.
Online reviews, then, have become another form of internet marketing that small businesses can't afford to ignore. While many small businesses think that they can't do anything about online reviews, that's not true. Just by actively encouraging customers to post reviews about their experience small businesses can weight online reviews positively. Sixty-eight percent of consumers left a local business review when asked. So assuming a business's products or services are not subpar, unfair negative reviews will get buried by reviews by happier customers.
In this video I show how you can get free likes to your Facebook Fan pages. When your page will get first 100 likes - Facebook will start display your page in their search bar. Also create groups for your affiliate product and pin/stick your post in that groups. Your post will stay on first positions and you will get traffic likes this when new members will join your groups. The more Fan pages and group you will create the more traffic you will get in future.
And while you’re at it -- don’t create an additional public, “professional” profile associated with your business. For example, I already have a personal profile on Facebook that I largely keep private; the practice I’m talking about would be if I created a second, public one under the name “AmandaZW HubSpot,” or something along those lines. People usually do that to connect with professional contacts on Facebook, without letting them see personal photos or other posts. But the fact of the matter is that creating more than one personal account goes against Facebook's terms of service.
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